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Conferences

    Charlotte Convention Center, North Carolina

    June 26, 2018 To June 28, 2018

    WHAT IS THIS EVENT ALL ABOUT? 3,000+ attendees.  320+ exhibitors.  50+ countries. The World’s Largest Hydropower Event! HydroVision International is the largest gathering of hydro professionals worldwide.Read more…

    San Francisco

    July 10, 2018 To July 12, 2018

    Covering the entire value chain of innovative battery and energy storage technologies, ees North America is the ideal platform for all stakeholders in the rapidly growing energy storage market. It takes place in the epicenter of the U.S. storage market: California.Read more…

    he “surplus” generation of renewable energy resources — wind, solar and in some cases, hydro — that exceeds the ability of the power system to deploy the energy available, is increasingly resulting in incidences of curtailment. These episodes of “turning off the spigot” can be the source of great consternation among project developers, utilities and renewable resource advocates. Rejection of available renewable energy is counterintuitive. In the face of vigorous de-carbonization efforts, expanding renewable portfolio mandates, tax and other incentives to stimulate greater renewable energy production, why would “free, clean and green” fuel-sourced power be dismissed at certain times? This seeming contradiction is present where renewable and distributed energy resources proliferate in a few areas of North America today; tomorrow, it is likely to be widespread. The problem remains that when more renewable energy is available than can be absorbed by the system, grid stability suffers and real-time market performance erodes. These system conflicts can be reduced through other measures, such as transmission capacity expansion, market enlargement, storage, and flexibility improvements in baseload generation resources. At present, though, these options are either jurisdictionally, technically or economically infeasible. That leaves curtailment as one of the few, remaining, plausible methods for shedding this orphan power. This program will examine the power system issues associated with renewable energy over-production relative to load and system capacity. It will review what tools are available to minimize these impacts, devoting particular attention to curtailment. The symposium will also consider ways that curtailment is being addressed today, how market and bilateral transactions are adapting compensation to accommodate curtailment, case studies of active network management of curtailment in the U.S. and Europe, and how renewable energy goals are achievable if curtailment is deployed. Learning Outcomes Discuss challenges associated with “surplus” renewable energy on the grid Review economic and financial impacts of variable renewable energy on wholesale power markets Evaluate options to address “surplus” renewable energy output Examine optimization of economic outcomes through curtailment Assess examples of active network management of renewable energy generation Analyze whether overbuilding capacity and curtailing excess production can still result in renewable energy goals attainment Discuss adapting market compensation to accommodate curtailment Identify negative pricing patterns in wholesale energy markets Discuss case studies of market participants favored and dis-favored by negative pricing Assess project developer perspectives of negative pricing and possible remedies Credits

    July 11, 2018 To July 12, 2018

    he “surplus” generation of renewable energy resources — wind, solar and in some cases, hydro — that exceeds the ability of the power system to deploy the energy available, is increasingly resulting in incidences of curtailment.  These episodes of “turning off the spigot” can be the source of great consternation…Read more…